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The Top 25 Think Tanks in Central and Eastern Europe (2008)

 

Name

Country

1

Carnegie Moscow Center

Russia

2

Institute of World Economy and International Relations

Russia

3

Center for Economic and Social Research (CASE)

Poland

4

Center for Policy Studies at Central European University

Hungary

5

F.A. Hayek Foundation

Slovakia

6

International Center for Policy Studies

Ukraine

7

Lithuanian Free Market Institute

Lithuania

8

Polish Institute of International Affairs

Poland

9

Centre for Liberal Strategies

Bulgaria

10

Liberalni Institut

Czech Republic

11

Hellenic Leadership Institute

Greece

12

Ludwig von Mises Institut

Romania

13

Center for International Relations (CSM)

Poland

14

INDEM Foundation

Russia

15

Prague Security Studies Institute

Czech Republic

16

Adriatic Institute for Policy Studies

Croatia

17

Albanian Institute for International Studies

Albania

18

Institute for Public Policy

Kyrgyzstan

19

Institute for the USA and Canadian Studies

Russia

20

Institute of International Relations

Czech Republic

21

New Economic School

Georgia

22

Center for Liberal-Democratic Studies

Serbia

23

Center for Security and Defense Studies

Hungary

24

Institute for Market Economics

Bulgaria

25

Institute for Public Affairs

Slovakia

26

International Center for Human Development

Armenia

27

Razumkov Centre

Ukraine

 

Eastern European think tanks have emerged in the last 15 years as a part of the political and economic transformation that swept the region. The strategy and structure of these institutions are more varied and policy-oriented than their counterparts in Western Europe. This is due, in part, because they benefited from entering the global marketplace of think tanks late and were therefore able to borrow the best features of independent public policy research organizations from around the world. They also received significant funding from public and private donors in Western Europe, North America and Asia that wanted to support the democratic transitions that were taking place in the region. The political dynamic at the moment of their creation also required that nongovernmental think tanks adopt a more activist and policy-oriented approach in their research and programs in order to bring about the change that was called for by the will of the people. This chain of events led to the creation of a whole set of institutions that look more like think tanks in the US than in Western Europe. As a result, a vibrant and innovative community of think tanks now exists in this region. These institutions have been so successful that they are now sharing their experiences with emerging think tanks in the Balkans and Eurasia. Issues of independence, capacity and sustainability are challenging these institutions as political tides shift and they move from start-up organizations to established institutions in post-communist societies. Much of the focus has shifted away from international donors as a means of support to national and regional (EU and NATO) sources of funding.

 

Source: James G. McGann, Ph.D., Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program, International Relations Program, University of Pennsylvania, The Global “Go-to Think Tanks” 2008 Survey Report.

Note: All rights reserved. No part of the above excerpt from The Global “Go-to Think Tanks” 2008 Survey Report the may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program.

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